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Auditions for Cabaret: Seeking Diverse Talents for Berlin Nightclub Production.

Cabaret Auditions

When choosing songs for your cabaret, try to pick ones that work with your theme or story. This will help to tie the act together and make it more cohesive.

This production will require strong singers for chorus parts. Diversity (all ages, races, genders, body shapes) is welcomed and encouraged.

Auditioning for a role

Auditioning for a cabaret role can be intimidating. However, if you have a positive attitude and stay focused on your goals, you can succeed. In addition, it is important to prepare by studying the show thoroughly. You can also prepare a monologue or a song to perform for the audition.

The musical is set in Berlin during Nazi Germany, and revolves around American writer Cliff Bradshaw and English cabaret singer Sally Bowles. The play features a variety of characters, including the Emcee and various featured performers at the seedy Kit Kat Klub. All genders are invited to audition for the roles, and preference is given to non-binary and genderfluid actors. The role of the Emcee requires agile stage movement and dance, as well as suggestive choreography.

Auditioning for an ensemble

Falcon’s Eye Theatre at Folsom Lake College is holding auditions for its production of Cabaret. The musical takes place in a seedy Berlin nightclub during the rise of the Nazis. The show centers on American writer Cliff Bradshaw and English cabaret performer Sally Bowles. Auditioners should prepare a song that showcases their vocal range and a short monologue.

While good singing is a must for cabaret, it’s important to remember that the audience is looking for more than just technically proficient performers. They want to feel connected to the singers and the story they’re telling. So it’s a good idea to work on delivering the bigger ideas behind your songs, rather than just trying to blow the audience away with crazy high-belting.

While cabaret is often confused with burlesque, the two genres have very different audiences. While burlesque has an adult audience, the majority of people who attend cabaret shows are general theatergoers. Unlike burlesque, cabaret is more sophisticated and uses a wide range of language and humor.

Auditioning for a musical director

Auditioning for a musical can be scary, but don’t worry! If you prepare well, your audition will go smoothly. Be sure to check out the script, watch a movie or video clip, or even better, attend a live performance of the show before your audition. This will give you a sense of the characters and the storyline, and help you feel more comfortable at your audition.

It is important to arrive on time for your audition, especially if you are attending an open call. Ensure that you have your ticket, know your conflicts, and where to find the audition room. Also, be prepared to bring a resume and headshot. In addition, it is a good idea to bring character shoes and dance attire for your dance audition. Lastly, be sure to pay attention to your posture. If you slouch, it will affect how you look on stage. A good posture will help you stand tall and feel confident throughout your audition.

Auditioning for a venue

The Harris Center for the Arts at Folsom Lake College is hosting auditions for its spring production of Kander and Ebb’s iconic musical, Cabaret. Featuring the decadent nightclub life of pre-WWII Germany, this heady show explores themes of change and the human struggle to survive in the face of tumultuous times.

Audition information is available at this link. Please be prepared to dance as all characters in this production will require dance skills. Wear form fitting dance clothing. Women should wear character heels and men should bring jazz shoes. Please be aware that all performers will be required to have a dance call, so please only sign up if you can commit to attending rehearsals and performances every week!

Emcee – Master of Ceremonies at the Kit Kat Klub-presented as a gender-fluid character comfortable with being close to both men and women; comedic, lovable; requires agile stage movement and dance. Age range and appearance flexible.

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Captivating the Spirit of Sports: The Evolution and Impact of Online Sports Broadcasts

Engaging an audience with a topic like 스포츠중계, or “sports broadcast” in English, is not just about relaying information. It’s about connecting with the zeal and fervor that people associate with watching their favorite teams and athletes compete. Imagine the thrill of witnessing a last-second game-winning shot, or the heart-pounding moments as athletes prepare for the final dash to the finish line. Sports broadcasts channel these electrifying moments and bring them straight into the homes and hearts of millions.

The world of sports broadcasting has evolved tremendously over the years. From radio commentaries to high-definition live streams, the transformation has been astounding. With the rise of online platforms, accessibility to sports has never been better. Fans can now indulge in their preferred sports from anywhere in the world, thanks to sites like 스포츠중계. These platforms offer an array of games and events, catering to the diverse tastes of sports enthusiasts.

Picture this: you’re an ardent football fan, and your local television channels are not airing the big match you’ve been waiting for all week. This is where sports broadcasts on the internet come to the rescue. Not only do they ensure you don’t miss a play, but they also offer a plethora of additional content – analysis, interviews, and more. The interactive features of these sites create community among fans, demolishing geographical barriers and uniting them under the banner of shared passion.

The seamless delivery of live events is not without challenges. Sports broadcasting demands meticulous coordination and state-of-the-art technology to capture every moment in real-time. The camera crew, producers, and commentators perform a carefully choreographed dance to deliver a product that seems to effortlessly bring the game to life. Each pass, each swing, each sprint is immortalized in perfect clarity, invoking a gamut of emotions from viewers.

As the game reaches its climax, the role of a skilled commentator becomes pivotal. Through their words, they not only convey action but also infuse it with excitement and context. They are the narrators of an unscripted drama, mythical sages who bridge the chasm between the audience and the athletes.

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NYC’s Cabaret Law and Its Impact on Social Dancing and Nightlife

Cabaret Law Revealed

Before it was repealed, NYC’s Cabaret Law required venues that have set show times and/or charge a cover to obtain a cabaret license. These establishments are also only allowed in certain zoning districts and Use Groups.

Even though the portion of the law that specified musicians must be fingerprinted was deemed unconstitutional in 1988, getting a cabaret license is still extremely difficult.

Legality

Currently only 97 establishments in the city have cabaret licenses. That means most of the people dancing in NYC bars and clubs are doing so illegally. But this could change. Since the 1990s, several organizations have worked tirelessly to pass legislation to repeal the Cabaret Law, including Legalize Dancing NYC and Metropolis in Motion.

The Dance Liberation Network was also instrumental in pushing for the bill. They worry that squelching legitimate venues through Cabaret law violations will drive people to less-safe underground parties and make the city more vulnerable to future disasters like the Ghost Ship fire.

Despite the repeal of the Cabaret Law, the dominant law restricting dancing in New York City remains the Zoning Resolution, which requires large establishments to have a liquor license and comply with building, health, fire and security codes. These laws will have a big impact on the number of places where social dancing is allowed. Until these laws are changed, many establishments will continue to have difficulty getting a license.

Permits

Back in the days of Prohibition and speakeasies, cabaret cards were coveted by performers like Chet Baker, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, Elmo Hope, and Jackie McLean. These cards were revoked for a variety of reasons, from drug charges to alleged obscenity. Many of these artists found their careers were essentially over when they lost their cards.

Nowadays, restaurants and clubs are required to obtain a cabaret license to allow dancing. To do so, establishments must prove that they are located in a zoning district that permits dancing and satisfy all other zoning requirements. They must also undergo a thorough inspection of their premises and meet all fire and building codes.

The annual fees for a cabaret license are based on the capacity of the establishment in persons. The director may impose additional fees for special events and for the use of the premises to be licensed. A license must be posted at the place of business.

Regulations

As a part of the Cabaret Law instituted during Prohibition to control speakeasies, establishments that allow dancing must obtain a Cabaret license. The application process is lengthy and includes a hefty fee. The venue must also demonstrate that it is in a zoning district that permits dancing, and meet all building and fire codes. Moreover, it must satisfy the local community board.

A cabaret license is not granted if another premises that holds such a license is within 500 feet. This applies to both existing and proposed licensees. In addition, the New York State Liquor Authority must find that public convenience and advantage will be served by granting a license.

A cabaret license does not allow a disc jockey or karaoke machine, nor can the licensed premises be used for sexually explicit performances. It also does not permit a male or female to expose their breasts unless fully clothed. In 2006, the Cabaret Law was challenged on First Amendment grounds in Festa v. City of New York, when members of Gotham West Coast Swing Club were denied their right to dance for fun.

Enforcement

After a long period of time when the Cabaret Law was mostly ignored, it was revived by Mayor Giuliani as part of his “broken windows” approach to policing. Now, if a venue has dancing and doesn’t have a cabaret license, the SLA can shut it down. In an episode of THUMP’s podcast, Rachel Nelson and John Barclay, owners of Happyfun Hideaway and Bossa Nova Civic Club, respectively, discussed the difficulties their businesses have faced because of the Cabaret Law.

Both are challenging the law in Federal court, arguing that it is unconstitutional and violates their Fourteenth Amendment rights. They argue that the law is outdated and discriminates against nightlife establishments and their patrons. In addition, they are seeking to have the cabaret license application process streamlined. The application requires that the applicant appear before their local community board and meet certain surveillance and security requirements. It also requires that the applicant pay a fee, which can be expensive for smaller venues.

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NYC’s Cabaret Law and Its Impact on Social Dancing and Nightlife

Cabaret Law Revealed

Before it was repealed, NYC’s Cabaret Law required venues that have set show times and/or charge a cover to obtain a cabaret license. These establishments are also only allowed in certain zoning districts and Use Groups.

Even though the portion of the law that specified musicians must be fingerprinted was deemed unconstitutional in 1988, getting a cabaret license is still extremely difficult.

Legality

Currently only 97 establishments in the city have cabaret licenses. That means most of the people dancing in NYC bars and clubs are doing so illegally. But this could change. Since the 1990s, several organizations have worked tirelessly to pass legislation to repeal the Cabaret Law, including Legalize Dancing NYC and Metropolis in Motion.

The Dance Liberation Network was also instrumental in pushing for the bill. They worry that squelching legitimate venues through Cabaret law violations will drive people to less-safe underground parties and make the city more vulnerable to future disasters like the Ghost Ship fire.

Despite the repeal of the Cabaret Law, the dominant law restricting dancing in New York City remains the Zoning Resolution, which requires large establishments to have a liquor license and comply with building, health, fire and security codes. These laws will have a big impact on the number of places where social dancing is allowed. Until these laws are changed, many establishments will continue to have difficulty getting a license.

Permits

Back in the days of Prohibition and speakeasies, cabaret cards were coveted by performers like Chet Baker, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, Elmo Hope, and Jackie McLean. These cards were revoked for a variety of reasons, from drug charges to alleged obscenity. Many of these artists found their careers were essentially over when they lost their cards.

Nowadays, restaurants and clubs are required to obtain a cabaret license to allow dancing. To do so, establishments must prove that they are located in a zoning district that permits dancing and satisfy all other zoning requirements. They must also undergo a thorough inspection of their premises and meet all fire and building codes.

The annual fees for a cabaret license are based on the capacity of the establishment in persons. The director may impose additional fees for special events and for the use of the premises to be licensed. A license must be posted at the place of business.

Regulations

As a part of the Cabaret Law instituted during Prohibition to control speakeasies, establishments that allow dancing must obtain a Cabaret license. The application process is lengthy and includes a hefty fee. The venue must also demonstrate that it is in a zoning district that permits dancing, and meet all building and fire codes. Moreover, it must satisfy the local community board.

A cabaret license is not granted if another premises that holds such a license is within 500 feet. This applies to both existing and proposed licensees. In addition, the New York State Liquor Authority must find that public convenience and advantage will be served by granting a license.

A cabaret license does not allow a disc jockey or karaoke machine, nor can the licensed premises be used for sexually explicit performances. It also does not permit a male or female to expose their breasts unless fully clothed. In 2006, the Cabaret Law was challenged on First Amendment grounds in Festa v. City of New York, when members of Gotham West Coast Swing Club were denied their right to dance for fun.

Enforcement

After a long period of time when the Cabaret Law was mostly ignored, it was revived by Mayor Giuliani as part of his “broken windows” approach to policing. Now, if a venue has dancing and doesn’t have a cabaret license, the SLA can shut it down. In an episode of THUMP’s podcast, Rachel Nelson and John Barclay, owners of Happyfun Hideaway and Bossa Nova Civic Club, respectively, discussed the difficulties their businesses have faced because of the Cabaret Law.

Both are challenging the law in Federal court, arguing that it is unconstitutional and violates their Fourteenth Amendment rights. They argue that the law is outdated and discriminates against nightlife establishments and their patrons. In addition, they are seeking to have the cabaret license application process streamlined. The application requires that the applicant appear before their local community board and meet certain surveillance and security requirements. It also requires that the applicant pay a fee, which can be expensive for smaller venues.

Scurry back to the main page

NYC’s Cabaret Law and Its Impact on Social Dancing and Nightlife

Cabaret Law Revealed

Before it was repealed, NYC’s Cabaret Law required venues that have set show times and/or charge a cover to obtain a cabaret license. These establishments are also only allowed in certain zoning districts and Use Groups.

Even though the portion of the law that specified musicians must be fingerprinted was deemed unconstitutional in 1988, getting a cabaret license is still extremely difficult.

Legality

Currently only 97 establishments in the city have cabaret licenses. That means most of the people dancing in NYC bars and clubs are doing so illegally. But this could change. Since the 1990s, several organizations have worked tirelessly to pass legislation to repeal the Cabaret Law, including Legalize Dancing NYC and Metropolis in Motion.

The Dance Liberation Network was also instrumental in pushing for the bill. They worry that squelching legitimate venues through Cabaret law violations will drive people to less-safe underground parties and make the city more vulnerable to future disasters like the Ghost Ship fire.

Despite the repeal of the Cabaret Law, the dominant law restricting dancing in New York City remains the Zoning Resolution, which requires large establishments to have a liquor license and comply with building, health, fire and security codes. These laws will have a big impact on the number of places where social dancing is allowed. Until these laws are changed, many establishments will continue to have difficulty getting a license.

Permits

Back in the days of Prohibition and speakeasies, cabaret cards were coveted by performers like Chet Baker, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, Elmo Hope, and Jackie McLean. These cards were revoked for a variety of reasons, from drug charges to alleged obscenity. Many of these artists found their careers were essentially over when they lost their cards.

Nowadays, restaurants and clubs are required to obtain a cabaret license to allow dancing. To do so, establishments must prove that they are located in a zoning district that permits dancing and satisfy all other zoning requirements. They must also undergo a thorough inspection of their premises and meet all fire and building codes.

The annual fees for a cabaret license are based on the capacity of the establishment in persons. The director may impose additional fees for special events and for the use of the premises to be licensed. A license must be posted at the place of business.

Regulations

As a part of the Cabaret Law instituted during Prohibition to control speakeasies, establishments that allow dancing must obtain a Cabaret license. The application process is lengthy and includes a hefty fee. The venue must also demonstrate that it is in a zoning district that permits dancing, and meet all building and fire codes. Moreover, it must satisfy the local community board.

A cabaret license is not granted if another premises that holds such a license is within 500 feet. This applies to both existing and proposed licensees. In addition, the New York State Liquor Authority must find that public convenience and advantage will be served by granting a license.

A cabaret license does not allow a disc jockey or karaoke machine, nor can the licensed premises be used for sexually explicit performances. It also does not permit a male or female to expose their breasts unless fully clothed. In 2006, the Cabaret Law was challenged on First Amendment grounds in Festa v. City of New York, when members of Gotham West Coast Swing Club were denied their right to dance for fun.

Enforcement

After a long period of time when the Cabaret Law was mostly ignored, it was revived by Mayor Giuliani as part of his “broken windows” approach to policing. Now, if a venue has dancing and doesn’t have a cabaret license, the SLA can shut it down. In an episode of THUMP’s podcast, Rachel Nelson and John Barclay, owners of Happyfun Hideaway and Bossa Nova Civic Club, respectively, discussed the difficulties their businesses have faced because of the Cabaret Law.

Both are challenging the law in Federal court, arguing that it is unconstitutional and violates their Fourteenth Amendment rights. They argue that the law is outdated and discriminates against nightlife establishments and their patrons. In addition, they are seeking to have the cabaret license application process streamlined. The application requires that the applicant appear before their local community board and meet certain surveillance and security requirements. It also requires that the applicant pay a fee, which can be expensive for smaller venues.

Scurry back to the main page

The Glamorous Attire of Cabaret: Emulating Liza Minnelli and Sally Bowles

Cabaret Costume Ideas

The Kit Kat Club’s dancers straddle the line between girly and grungy. Choose light neutrals like blush pink or champagne and add a pair of sturdy heels to your ensemble.

When Liza Minnelli donned a halter top, short-shorts, derby, garters and lace-up boots in the movie version of Cabaret, she created an instant cinema icon. Here’s how you can emulate her look for your next stage performance.

What is a Cabaret?

In a nutshell, a cabaret is an interactive theatrical experience that incorporates music, dance and comedy. It is different from musical theatre because it allows performers to speak directly to the audience and use their voices in a way that would be impossible in a traditional musical.

The first cabaret, Le Chat Noir opened in the bohemian Montmartre district of Paris back in 1881. It became a popular venue for poets and artists to test their new work, while audiences enjoyed a night of entertainment for the price of a few drinks.

While the genre was heavily censored in its early days, it flourished during the Weimar era in Germany. This is when famous performers like Josephine Baker and Marlene Dietrich brought glamour, provocation and sexuality to the world of cabaret. It is these elements that helped the show gain widespread popularity around the world and spawned the iconic movie Moulin Rouge. Cabaret is now considered its own distinct art form separate from lounge singing, musical theatre and concert and recital music.

The Iconic Liza Minnelli Look

The costumes worn in any theatrical or cinematic production shape how an audience perceives the setting, characters and overall tone. In Cabaret, the costumes of Sally Bowles and other performers at the Kit Kat Club help to define issues of gender and sexuality.

When LIFE photographer Bill Eppridge snapped this photo of Liza Minnelli, the 19-year-old daughter of Judy Garland was preparing to make her Broadway debut in Flora the Red Menace. Her costumes conflate her own sense of style with the ultra-chic big city sophisticate she plays in Bob Fosse’s classic 1972 film Cabaret. Halston fashioned the outfit, which features a black velvet dress and hat that would be just as chic today.

Minnelli wore the outfit on This Is Tom Jones in 1970 and again at the London Palladium in 1972. Her bold lashes and red lips make the costume her own.

The Sally Bowles Look

Although Sally Bowles has been portrayed in many different ways since Christopher Isherwood first wrote her character in his 1937 novella, the iconic version of her came to be through Bob Fosse’s 1972 film Cabaret. The film’s widely publicized image of Liza Minnelli in slinky, black lingerie and straddling a chair (with one leg lifted as an homage to her cabaret predecessor Marlene Dietrich in The Blue Angel) encapsulates both Sally’s look and the tone of the movie.

Sally Bowles is a headstrong young woman who left post-World War II Britain to pursue her dream of becoming the next Clara Bow or Carole Lombard in the world of silent films. She is naive and winsome, yet she holds onto a sense of hope that trumps the bubbling horrors in Weimar Germany that will eventually make their way into Kit Kat Klub.

Dame Natasha Richardson originated the role of Sally Bowles in Roundabout Theatre Company’s 1998 production of the musical, which would go on to win the Tony Award for Best Musical. Her take on the character was a sexier, more energetic, and less tragic version of the role.

The Kit Kat Club Look

If anyone dares argue that musical theatre is mere froth and can’t say anything substantial, point them in the direction of Rebecca Frecknall’s dazzling revival of John Kander and Fred Ebb’s 1966 stage classic Cabaret. Now playing at London’s Playhouse Theatre, the production is set in the gilded Berlin of 1930s – a place where liberal partying is about to be rudely upended by history.

This is an epic story of a man’s search for identity and his fight to stay alive, so – unsurprisingly – the costumes have to be equally grand. Tom Scutt’s evocative designs feature neo-Baroque shapes and neo-Grecian statues bearing wheat sheaves that hint at the Kaiser’s overbearing Wilhelminism.

The full ensemble (including RWCMD graduate Callum Scott Howells as Emcee and Madeline Brewer as Sally Bowles) deliver the giddy material with energy and conviction. Isabella Byrd’s lighting design elicits swooping shadows and sudden shafts of illumination. And Julia Cheng’s rich choreography combines waacking and jazz with angular freezes, chest pumps and shimmies.

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Enhance Your Football Viewing Experience

Get the Best From 무료 축구중계

Who won’t love to keep tabs on their favorite sports? Whether it’s world cup qualifiers or La Liga, there’s something incredibly special about catching up on a match. But how do you get the most out of it? Let’s dive into some simple tactics.

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Living and Singing in Nazi Germany

Cabaret Full Movie Review

Cabaret is a stunning movie musical, one of the best ever made. It shows how people continue to live their lives in the face of encroaching fascism and war.

Flamboyant American cabaret singer Sally Bowles and British language teacher Brian Roberts navigate their relationship against the backdrop of Nazi Germany in this groundbreaking and iconic film.

Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli)

In Cabaret, Minnelli delivers a tour de force performance as Sally Bowles, the star of Berlin’s seedy Kit Kat Club. She is backed by the ever-impressive Joel Grey as the Master of Ceremonies, who effortlessly fuses the play’s vaudevillian style of camp with an old-timey jazz score. The musical numbers are the heart of this film, and Fosse’s camera gives viewers a front-row seat to experience them in all their kaleidoscopic splendor.

Based on Christopher Isherwood’s novella of the same name, Van Druten’s play I Am a Camera, and Kander and Ebb’s music, Sally Bowles is a show-stopper. A hedonistic caricature of a cabaret singer, she is a character with both lightness and darkness.

In addition to stealing the scene whenever she is on screen, Minnelli’s Sally is also a natural at singing and dancing. Her spirited personality makes it easy to understand why this role earned her an Oscar. It’s no wonder that Bob Fosse considered her his most memorable directorial effort to date.

Brian Roberts (Michael York)

It’s half a century since Cabaret first sashayed into cinemas, and its depressing themes of moral decadence remain just as potent today. The film’s slyly humorous and evocative songs serve a double purpose, providing entertainment while commenting on the dark issues beneath the surface.

Cambridge University student Brian Roberts moves into a cheap Berlin boarding house and befriends American club singer Sally Bowles, who works the Kit Kat Klub’s seedy strip bar. Sally’s outward flamboyance and sexual prowess are matched by her intellectual curiosity, and they become close friends.

Brian and Sally begin a romantic relationship, but the film takes an unexpected turn when Brian bangs the rich, aristocratic Baron Maximilian and enters a closed homosexual triad. This was one of the film’s first mainstream depictions of male bisexuality and was a watershed moment in queer representation on screen. With the sexy, risqué musical numbers, acerbic script and stunning performances from Liza Minnelli and Michael York, it’s no wonder Cabaret earned eight Academy Award nominations.

Baron Max von Heune (Helmut Griem)

While Cabaret avoids showing two men kiss, its songs and drama about social collapse center on sexual transgression. Helmut Griem -who is blessed with matinee idol looks and a strong erotic confidence- was no stranger to such roles. He is the suave baron, Maximilian von Heune, who seduces Sally and Brian. He has blond hair, a mustache, and an appetitive gap-tooth smile.

The movie is set during the closing days of the Weimar Republic in Germany and the rise of Nazism. Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli) is an effusive singer at the seedy Kit Kat club while English PhD candidate Brian Roberts (Michael York) makes his living by teaching private lessons to locals for three marks an hour. They are roommates and romantic partners who fall in love. But their relationship is tested when they are showered with presents from the rich and suave Max von Heune. Can they stand against fascism together? Or will they be torn apart by their own desires?

Master of Ceremonies (Joel Grey)

A young American (Brian Roberts) in Berlin takes a job in a Kit Kat club run by a sleazy, sinister emcee, while Nazi Germany’s power is growing. The film’s razzle-dazzle musical numbers and Oscar-winning score capture the tumultuous atmosphere of a world that’s changing rapidly and for the worse.

The stage and screen legend Joel Grey, 83, whose performance as the impish Master of Ceremonies in Bob Fosse’s classic film Cabaret won him a Tony and an Academy Award, opens up about his long and storied career onstage and in front of the camera. He’s here with Terry Gross to talk about his new memoir, Master of Ceremonies.

Throughout the book, he recounts his own sexual awakening as well as his complicated relationship with his parents. We’ll hear about the revelations that inspired the characters he created, and how the emcee in Cabaret helped him to discover a new way of being. JOEL GREY: (Singing) Willkommen, bienvenue, fremder, etranger, stranger, glucklich zu sehen, je suis enchanté, bleibe, rest, stay.

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Montreal’s Cabaret L’Enfer: A Haunting Culinary Experience

Cabaret L’Enfer Opens in Montreal

After a few years of perfecting his craft at Le Mousso, chef Massimo Piedimonte is ready to open Cabaret l’enfer. A Montreal restaurant modeled after the famous cabaret in Montmartre, it promises a performance like no other.

Customers rave about the food and service at this spot. They also love the pretty atmosphere.

Food

The menu is a nod to both the city’s French roots and its Italian ones, with items like burrata paired with black currant oil, beef tartare with Carta Di Musica (traditional Sardinian crackers) and ravioli stuffed with lobster, fava beans and raspberry leaves. For drinks, Piedimonte has enlisted mixologue Emile Archambault and sommelier Frederic Letourneau.

This is the first restaurant from chef Massimo Piedimonte, who has a reputation for perfection and a knack for finding new talent to work with. He comes to Cabaret l’Enfer after years at Le Mousso, where he was one of the most ferocious kitchen leaders in Montreal. He and his team — Santiago Alonso as chef de cuisine, Edouard Belanger as sous-chef, Etienne Charlebois as sommelier, Emile Archambault as mixologue and Glenn Hoffman as manager — have been working on this project for years, through delays and pandemic interruptions. It’s finally opening in spring 2021.

Drink

Guests of this Montmartre venue can expect a spooky experience that is both gastronomic and atmospheric. In the style of an abandoned Parisian theatre meets a grotesque Ossuary, this restaurant is sure to send a chill down your spine.

When it comes to food, Piedimonte draws from his French culinary training and Italian heritage for the menu. Expect burrata with black currant oil, beef tartare paired with Carta Di Musica, and ravioli or agnolotti made with ricotta and hazelnuts.

The restaurant’s name is a tribute to the cabaret l’enfer of 1890s Paris, which featured an entrance in the shape of a grotesque mouth. It was next door to a Heaven-themed cafe, and both became renowned for macabre spectacles and performances that were unlike anything the City of Lights had seen at the time. The Parisian venues have since disappeared, but the cabaret’s facade is now a Monoprix supermarket.

Performances

In a time when the bizarre was the norm, cabaret l’enfer was a place to indulge in sensuous and grotesque performances. Founded in 1892 near Montmartre, this unique venue aspired to be more than just entertainment; it was a portal into the underbelly of Paris—a hellish wonderland with an entrance resembling the gaping jaws of Leviathan symbolizing damnation.

Visitors were greeted by the Devil’s doorman who urged them to “Enter and be Damned!” In addition, there was a diabolical floor show where a man dressed as Mephistopheles would frighten patrons. Other performances incorporated acrobatics, juggling and a series of rapid tableaux that depicted the agonies of death.

The cabaret closed in 1925, but its hellish facade at 53 Boulevard de Clichy survived until the 1950s when it was razed to make way for a Monoprix supermarket. Fortunately, photographs taken by Eugene Atget and Robert Doisneau—as well as a shot by Harry C. Ellis, an American photographer who captured everyday occupations and street scenes—documented the illuminating spectacle.

Venue

Unlike some Montmartre cafes that were macabre in nature, l’Enfer’s titillating performances danced on the edge of societal acceptability. This ambiance was accentuated by the fact that the cabaret’s entrance resembled the gaping jaws of Leviathan, symbolizing damnation.

This imposing entrance, captured in the photograph above by Eugene Atget, was emblematic of the eerie allure that surrounded The Cabaret de l’Enfer. Jules Claretie noted that future historians of the Belle Epoque “could not silently pass by these cabarets, which put Dante’s poem within walking distance.”

Massimo plans to continue the restaurant’s ethos, introducing new wine selections and hiring Raphaelle Berube, a talented sommelier known for her work at Le Mousso and Candide, as director of the bar. This will help to focus the venue’s ethos on the quality and variety of wines offered to guests. He also hopes to entrust another member of the team with the responsibility of developing a list primarily composed of natural and biodynamic wines.

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